Keith Giffen

Paul Kupperberg on June 11th, 2021

NOW AVAILABLE!

Direct Comments: Comic Book Creators in Their Own Words
The DC Direct Currents Interview Transcripts (1989 – 1991)
Conducted, Transcribed, and Annotated by Paul Kupperberg

Cover by Aalishaa/fiverr
Buffalo Avenue Books
Paperback & eBook
Nonfiction / Comic Book History
192 pages
$16.00 / $7.00 eBook

Comic Book Creators in their Own Words!

Read the rest

Continue reading about Direct Comments: Comic Book Creators in their Own Words

Paul Kupperberg on May 12th, 2020
Keith Giffen, me, Marty Pasko, at Terrificon, August 2017.

I made Marty Pasko my comedy bitch one night at a comic book convention in the late-1970s or early-1980s. I could always make Marty laugh; I’m a fairly funny guy and he was a fairly easy audience, but I didn’t own him until that night when a bunch of us were gathered in somebody’s hotel room where some drinking might have been taking place, and I announced, likely apropos of nothing, that I could crack Marty up in just three random phrases.… Read the rest

Continue reading about Marty Pasko (1954-2020)

Paul Kupperberg on March 21st, 2020
Cover by HOWARD PORTER.

I’ve always liked this story, “Visions of Glory,” the framing sequence for the 80-page Justice League Quarterly #16 (September 1994), the “All Glory Issue” featuring four stories starring General Glory. General Glory was a star spangled parody of the straitlaced, upright Captain America created by the irrepressible Keith Giffen and J.M.… Read the rest

Continue reading about Glory Days

Paul Kupperberg on August 17th, 2016

A back-up story I wrote for DC Comics’ Atari Force #13 (January 1985), pencilled by Dave Manak and inked by Keith Giffen that I have no recollection of, even after just stumbling across it in a box of old duplicates. And even though I wrote it, I still gotta ask: What’s a Hukka?… Read the rest

Continue reading about Obscurities: Hukka-Huh?

Paul Kupperberg on January 8th, 2016

Ehapa-Red-BlueIn the 1980s, Ehapa, the publisher to which DC Comics licensed its German (other other countries) reprints, was asking DC Comics for as much new Superman material as the company could provide. At the time, Superman was appearing in Superman, Action Comics, DC Comics Presents, and World’s Finest, but there was apparently an insatiable appetite for more Man of Steel for this part of the European market.… Read the rest

Continue reading about Obscurities: Das Comics